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Tree Division 2It’s here! Monsoon Season officially begins June 15th and runs through September 30th. This is the time to expect a change in the air, the humidity will increase, big billowing clouds will start to form in the East, and the winds will soon change from the west to the southeast.  That will signal the beginning of the Southwest desert “Monsoon season”, a time when large thunderstorms build along the Mogollon Rim and move southwest as they increase in intensity.

The Sonoran Desert is defined by two rainy seasons per year, one of them being the Arizona Monsoon. As much as 70% of rainfall in the region can occur during the summer monsoon, we typically receive one third of our annual rainfall during this time. Because of this, our desert is considered relatively “wet” when compared to others such as the Sahara. The word “monsoon” comes from the Arabic “mausim” which means “season” or “wind shift”.

With these storms come severe outflow winds caused by the towering thunder clouds collapsing under their own weight, followed by strong winds and dust. These winds, as we all know, cause extensive damage to structures, trees and just about anything else in their path.  With proper planning prior to the Monsoon events, most damage to trees can be mitigated with a tree management program.

As the humidity increases, plant growth will be stimulated and desert adapted plants will start to bloom.  The humidity increase will be the final blow to any remaining Rye grass that did not succumb to the intense heat of June.

A tree management program will address any hazards that may threaten the public and property, correct structural defects and help build a healthy “Urban Forest”.  Make sure you have properly staked trees and that you have had a professional walk your property to look for hazard trees.

Finally, after the dust has blown through and the rains have begun, open your windows and enjoy the cool breeze and the smells of our native desert plants.

Care To Know: This is also the perfect time to get pre-emergent herbicides applied.  The rains will help incorporate the Herbicide into the soil where it can be effective against weed seed germination.

Remember it is always best to have a plan. If you have any questions, please ask your Caretaker Professional.

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